2014 Benefit Banquet Recap

Volunteers, supporters, and staff came together at the 2014 Benefit Banquet to celebrate 30 years of service in the inner city of San Francisco. Excitement filled the air as guests walked in and began to intermingle. Select staff were standing by various booths to display the three types of work used for revitalization: relief, rehabilitation and development. Each department was placed under one of the three types of work to explain their role and how they work to intervene. Each booth included the following departments:

  1. RELIEF

    • Meal Deliveries (food for community residents)

    • Food Bank / Rescue Mission (Food supply and walk-in diner)

    • Adopt A Building (home visitation, prayer & discipleship)
       

  2. REHABILITATION

    • Health & Wellness Center (Medical Clinic)

    • Discipleship Home (Addiction Recovery)
       

  3. DEVELOPMENT

    • SF City Academy (K to 8th grade elementary school)

    • Social Enterprise (TL Made & TL Thrift store / job creation)

A station featuring TL Made, the social enterprise initiative within SF City Impact (SFCI), had products available for purchase. A booth also featured the new Impact Epicenter, which consolidates office space and create availability in the one of the school building’s from 100 to 250 students.

Prior to dinner, a moment of prayer was taken and table sponsors were thanked for their support. Musical artist and City Impact staff member, Dane Ohri, opened up with live music as guests enjoyed the setting. Into the night, Christian Huang dove into why SF CIty Impact exists and painted a picture of what it is like to serve in the inner city of San Francisco:

“We exist to intervene on behalf of the people in the inner-city but in an effort to intervene, we’ve seen the lives of our donors and volunteers change too. It is a beautiful picture of reciprocity, in an effort to serve others, many people have found themselves. For every life that has been impacted in the community, a life has been impacted by this community. For as much as we have invested in the Tenderloin, we have also received from this beautiful community.”

Stories were shared of staff members and leadership students intervening in the community and going above and beyond the meet the call to love their neighbor. A couple included were: a story of immediate relief given to suicidal friend, and a homeless person invited in a staff members home.   

Roger and Maite Huang were recognized for their many years of service to the inner city of San Francisco. A display of 50 sandwiches was presented as a visual, to dedicate the simple act of intervening that happened over 30 years ago. That 50 sandwiches has turned into what is now a K-8 school of 120 kids, a food bank and rescue mission, a medical clinic, a low income thrift store, a social enterprise business, a recovery home and an Adopt a building initiative.

Select individuals shared how their lives have been changed by City Impact, one of which is Dino, a once recipient of City Impact’s services and now the coordinator of the Life and Development Center at SFCI.

“I am a living, breathing testimony of City Impact’s vision. I now get to help people who go through what I have gone through,” said Dino.

A highlight of the banquet was when SF City Academy students took stage and sang, Love Came Down, with John Luoma, City Impact’s Discipleship Home Manager and Jess McKinney.

Lastly, guests had a chance to intervene and take a stand to make an impact and support select departments for the remainder of the quarter. A set list of needs was provided and each impact was quantified for 2014 year end. The benefit banquet was split into two locations on separate dates: San Francisco and Lafayette.

Thank you to all the faithful volunteers, advocates and donors for your generous support. It is because of your giving that an impact is truly being made in the lives in the inner city of San Francisco.

If you are considering a gift this season, check out the Top 10 Needs before deciding where to give. Learn more.

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